Monday, September 10, 2007


Get a Deep Insight into Mobile Maps and Navigation Markets


location based services
portable navigation devices



( )LYON, France, Sep 10, 2007 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report related to the worldwide telecommunication industry is now available to its catalogue.
Mobile Maps and Navigation
http://www.reportlinker.com/p058464/Mobile-Maps-Navigation.html
Mobile Maps and Navigation gives first-hand insights into the development of online maps and turn-by-turn navigation services for mobile handsets.
This report provides you with 100+ pages of unique business intelligence including 5-year industry forecasts and expert commentary on which to base your business decisions.
This report will allow you to:
-- Understand how the experience of online maps and turn-by-turn navigation can be transferred to mobile devices.
-- Learn about the latest mobile propositions from leading map and navigation providers.
-- Identify new business opportunities and revenue models for mobile location based services.
-- Realize the true commercial potential of local search, mobile maps and handset navigation.
-- Profit from valuable insights about the most successful technology propositions on the market.
This report answers the following questions:
-- Can the success for portable navigation devices be repeated with mobile devices?
-- What are the business models and revenue opportunities for local search and navigation?
-- What are the main differences and similarities of the European and North American markets?
-- Who are the leading suppliers of digital maps and geo-content for mobile applications?
-- How are industry leaders such as Nokia, TomTom, Google and Yahoo! positioning themselves on the emerging market?
-- Will it be on-board or off-board turn-by-turn navigation solutions that prevail in the mobile space?
-- What are the future prospects for mobile local search and mapping applications?
Executive Summary
While the PND segment continues to dominate the personal navigation market in Europe as well as in North America, handset-based mapping and turn-by-turn navigation services are being discovered by an increasing number of handset owners. Whereas handset-based local search, mapping and full turn-by-turn navigation services are largely separate services today, these are increasingly being integrated into one service with a common user interface. Today, navigation services are mostly available as onboard solutions with map data stored in the memory of the handset, or off-board services that rely on maps stored on a server. Many of these solutions may well converge into hybrid services that leverage the handset connectivity to allow access to new maps, dynamic content and new services such as location messaging and sharing of geo-coded content.
In the future, handset navigation services are likely to complement other personal navigation solutions, for instance for use outside the car. Pedestrian navigation features that are about to be launched include improved map material and enhanced 3D views to facilitate orientation.
Multimodal navigation will enable the user to plan routes that take into account all available modes of transportation, including trains, busses, trams and even ferries and airplanes. New functionality that enhances everyday usefulness of navigation services that are being launched includes better traffic information and improved local search.
Although advertisement funded services are already being launched in several markets by various actors, such as mapping and directory providers, it will likely take several years before partnerships are established that will lead to significant revenues. Premium services that dominate the market today will most likely coexist with ad-funded services in the future.
However, most premium services will be provided by network operators to stimulate ARPU by bundling navigation with service plans, or by handset vendors to encourage handset sales.
In 2006, sales of onboard navigation software for smartphones increased to nearly 0.6 million units, with the European market accounting for the majority of shipments. The year marked a breakthrough for off-board navigation services in North America. Following increased marketing by large network operators, subscriber additions increased to an estimated 1.5 million and the total subscriber base reached about 1.9 million. In Europe, where the market is more fragmented and the installed base of GPS-equipped handsets is much smaller, subscriber additions nonetheless increased to over 300,000 and the number of subscribers grew to 650,000. However, the publisher forecasts that the European market will overtake the North American market in 2010 when mass-market GPS-equipped GSM/UMTS handsets are likely to become widely available. By 2012, an estimated 28 million subscribers in Europe and 15 million subscribers in North America will use their handset for navigation at least once per year.
Table of content
1 Mobile navigation solutions
1.1 Portable navigation solutions
1.1.1 PNDs, PDAs, smartphones and mobile phones
1.1.2 Usability aspects
1.2 Digital maps and content
1.2.1 Digital map data
1.2.2 POI data
1.2.3 Rich and dynamic content
1.3 Navigation software platforms
1.3.1 Functionality
1.3.2 Onboard and off-board navigation platforms
1.3.3 Mapping and navigation server platforms
1.4 Enabling technologies
1.4.1 Handset performance
1.4.2 Positioning technologies
1.5 Handset-based mapping and navigation services
1.5.1 Mobile local search
1.5.2 Mapping and routing
1.5.3 Turn-by-turn navigation software and services
1.5.4 Operator navigation offerings
2 Map data and content providers
2.1 Digital map data suppliers
2.1.1 NAVTEQ
2.1.2 Tele Atlas
2.1.3 AND
2.2 Directory publishers
2.2.1 DasOrtliche
2.2.2 Eniro
2.2.3 Pages Jaunes Groupe
2.2.4 Seat Pagine Gialle
2.2.5 The Yell Group
2.3 Travel guide, POI data and weather information providers
2.3.1 CustomWeather
2.3.2 Falk Marco Polo Interactive
2.3.3 Fodor's
2.3.4 ViaMichelin
2.3.5 Wcities
2.4 Traffic information providers
2.4.1 Inrix
2.4.2 ITIS Holdings
2.4.3 Mediamobile
2.4.4 SmartRoute Systems
2.4.5 Trafficmaster
2.4.6 T-Systems Traffic
3 Mapping and local search providers
3.1 Cityneo
3.2 Google
3.3 Mappy
3.4 MapQuest
3.5 Microsoft
3.6 m-spatial
3.7 NAVITIME
3.8 Novasys
3.9 Rand McNally
3.10 Yahoo!
3.11 YellowMap
4 Onboard navigation software vendors
4.1 ALK
4.2 Augmentra
4.3 Destinator Technologies
4.4 Garmin
4.5 InfoPortugal
4.6 Navicore
4.7 NAVIGON
4.8 NavNGo
4.9 ROUTE 66
4.10 TomTom
5 Server-based navigation solution vendors
5.1 Appello Systems
5.2 Jentro Technologies
5.3 LocatioNet Systems
5.4 Nav4All
5.5 Networks In Motion
5.6 PTV
5.7 TeleCommunication Systems
5.8 TeleNav
5.9 Telmap
5.10 Trimble
5.11 WaveMarket
5.12 Wayfinder Systems
5.13 Webraska
6 Case studies: Mobile maps and navigation applications
6.1 Handset manufacturers
6.1.1 Nokia
6.1.2 Motorola
6.1.3 HTC
6.1.4 Research In Motion
6.2 Mobile operator navigation services
6.2.1 A1 Navi from Mobilkom Austria
6.2.2 VZ Navigator from Verizon Wireless
6.3 Mobile Web 2.0 applications
6.3.1 Google Maps for mobile
6.3.2 Yahoo! Go
7 Market forecasts and trends
7.1 Vendor market shares
7.2 Smartphone and GPS handsets sales
7.3 Onboard navigation solutions
7.4 European off-board navigation and mapping services
7.4.1 Off-board navigation subscribers
7.4.2 Off-board navigation service revenues
7.5 North American off-board navigation and mapping services
7.5.1 Off-board navigation subscribers
7.5.2 Off-board navigation service revenues
Glossary

2 comments:

sweep1 said...

Volts,
I am a serial entrepreneur following the lbs, rtls industries as potential business opportunities. As a former ceo of a "bleeding edge" unified messaging public startup, I am all too familiar with the exhiliration of creating a company in an emerging technology space and the depression created if it doesn't succeed. But that's prologue, do you know anything about ALK Technologies in Princeton other than what's on your blog? Also, are you aware of any activity at Yale in this space? Thanks in advance.

sweep1 said...

Volts,
I am a serial entrepreneur following the lbs, rtls industries as potential business opportunities. As a former ceo of a "bleeding edge" unified messaging public startup, I am all too familiar with the exhiliration of creating a company in an emerging technology space and the depression created if it doesn't succeed. But that's prologue, do you know anything about ALK Technologies in Princeton other than what's on your blog? Also, are you aware of any activity at Yale in this space? Thanks in advance.